Premises Liability

Morrow & Sheppard are privileged to represent injured persons who are injured because of a dangerous condition on property belonging to another person or business.

Please click here for a free, confidential consultation to discuss your legal rights before they are jeopardized.

Questions Regarding Personal Injury Cases?

People who are harmed by dangerous property conditions may be entitled to bring traditional negligence and personal injury claims. To learn answers to questions commonly asked about these cases, please click here.

Premises Liability Cases

Property owners typically owe legal duties to protect visitors and workers on their property from dangerous conditions.

As a result, if you have been injured due to a dangerous property condition where you work, or somewhere you were invited or that is open to the public, you may be entitled to compensation under “premises liability” laws.

Where Premises Liability Accidents Occur

Premises liability accidents can occur in a variety of places, including:

  • Apartment complexes
  • Commercial and retail spaces including supermarkets, malls, and movie theaters
  • Hotels
  • Houses
  • Office buildings
  • Parking garages
  • Worksites including plants, refineries, industrial facilities, and construction sites

Examples of Dangerous Conditions

There are countless examples of dangerous conditions that can cause a personal injury accident, including issues with:

  • Barricades
  • Drowning risks including canals, hot tubs, and swimming pools
  • Electrical systems
  • Elevators
  • Escalators
  • Falling objects that were not properly secured
  • Grating
  • Improper markings or warnings
  • Open holes
  • Railings
  • Sidewalks and walkways
  • Slippery floors and walking surfaces
  • Stairs
  • Uneven or broken flooring

Duties Owed By Landowners

A landowner’s duty to compensate a person injured by a dangerous property condition depends on the reason why the person was present. In Texas, there are three basic categories of people who enter upon land:

  1. Trespasser – someone who enters without permission or invitation. Usually, a landowner’s only duty to trespassers is not to willfully or intentionally injure them.
  2. Licensee – someone who has permission to enter, but who does not enter for a business purpose. The classic example is a party guest. Typically, a property owner must not be grossly negligent in permitting a dangerous condition to exist, and must warn licensees of hidden dangers that he or she knows about.
  3. Invitee – typically someone who enters public property or a business with the owner’s knowledge or consent, which may result in mutual benefit. This would include store patrons, moviegoers, or someone who visits a business. A property owner owes invitees a duty to use reasonable care to make the property safe. She has a duty to warn of not just dangers he or she knows about, but also dangers he or she could have identified if reasonable care had been exercised.

Bringing A Premises Liability Lawsuit

Premises liability claims are difficult to prove. You need to hire a lawyer as soon as possible after the accident so that your claims can be investigated and documented.

If you believe you or a family member was injured or killed by a dangerous condition on property belonging to another person or business, contact us now for a free, confidential consultation.

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